Chronic pain need not be a life sentence

According to a recent Globe and Mail report, Canadians now have the dubious honour of being the world’s biggest users of narcotic painkillers per capita! Chronic pain has become the most common reason that people see doctors. And, over the past decade, opioids have been the drug of choice. But this course of treatment has […]

3D Prisoner breaking chainsAccording to a recent Globe and Mail report, Canadians now have the dubious honour of being the world’s biggest users of narcotic painkillers per capita!

Chronic pain has become the most common reason that people see doctors. And, over the past decade, opioids have been the drug of choice. But this course of treatment has come with the undesired side effect of addiction, which has led to a growing health crisis of opioid overdose deaths.

No one wants a lifetime of chronic pain. And it’s unlikely that many intend to become an opioid addict, even when a strong painkiller seemed to be a good choice at the time.

My friend, Ray, found a solution to pain and addiction through a purely spiritual approach. He had enjoyed more than four decades of good health when he was rushed to the hospital in sudden need of emergency surgery. Taking medication had never been part of his health regimen; however, he felt that the intentions of the compassionate medical personnel were sincere when it was strongly suggested, upon his discharge, that he continue with the prescription painkillers to enable his complete recovery. This was the beginning of his addiction.

Millions in distress with chronic pain might wonder if there is no alternative to the cycle of pain, prescription drugs and potential addiction–no light at the end of a tunnel of suffering. They might feel like Jeremiah in the Bible when he asked, “Why does my pain never end? Why is my wound so deep? Why can’t I ever get well?” (Jer. 15:18 NIRV)

As God gave Jeremiah a promise of deliverance in response to his outcry, so I find the answer to those questions in Jesus’ healing works. He never accepted that pain or suffering was inevitable or incurable! He challenged the popular opinions of his day – and ours – regarding the health and well-being of every individual.

Today, do we feel that Jesus’ healing of every chronic and incurable illness was a miracle, a one-time inexplicable phenomenon and therefore no longer a present possibility in our age of advanced biomedical research? And yet he said we would do greater things than he did! He promised, “Anyone who believes in me will do the works I have been doing. In fact, they will do even greater things.” (John 14:12 NIRV)

How is that possible in this day and age?

Jesus appealed to a higher law than what were believed to be accepted matter-based health laws. He appealed to the law of God, which is good, loving and ever operative – in all ages.

If this sounds unbelievable, consider other laws that were at one time an accepted fact, such as the sun revolving around the earth. Galileo debunked this “law”, which was really only a belief; so opening up new possibilities and freedoms for man to explore. The earth was no longer flat and scary! And science continues to find new discoveries that open our eyes to possibilities that were always there, but unseen – most recently of gravitational waves, which Einstein predicted over a hundred years ago.

So which law actually governs our health? The higher law of God is what my friend Ray appealed to. Although at times he was tempted to just give up and live with the pain and pills, his prayers strengthened his understanding that God’s law of only good supported, protected and could heal him.

In his study of the Bible and the companion book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Carefree manMary Baker Eddy, he learned more about his identity as the child of a loving God (see Genesis 1:26,27). If God defined his identity, he came to realize, then he had to be spiritually as perfect as God.

Like Jesus, who saw the God-created man beneath the surface of what appeared to others as a person in pain or incurably diseased, Ray decided he did not have to believe what a majority of people believed about his condition. With courage and spiritual resolve, he appealed to the higher law of God for his health and well-being. This resolve grew stronger through Ray’s continued biblical study and prayer over the next few months, until the addiction fell away without any withdrawal effects. His strength and health returned.

The relentless cycle of pain and drug dependency can be broken. Ray’s experience is practical evidence of that.

As I am a community blogger with Metroland Media, you can read this article in various outlets, such as Simcoe News.

Addiction: Moving beyond “do no harm”

The Hippocratic oath taken by doctors avows to ‘First do no harm’. But Canadian doctors are in a quandary. They have patients in chronic pain for which opioids are the prescription drug of choice. Yet the harm from them is significant. Canada is now the second largest consumer of opioids in the world, and recent […]

Shift dependency on drugs to a liberating realization of divine Love

Shift dependency on drugs to a liberating realization – a Love that governs health

The Hippocratic oath taken by doctors avows to ‘First do no harm’. But Canadian doctors are in a quandary. They have patients in chronic pain for which opioids are the prescription drug of choice. Yet the harm from them is significant.

Canada is now the second largest consumer of opioids in the world, and recent news headlines alert us that overdose deaths from opioid use have spiked.

Members of the medical community indicate that one solution is to simply write fewer opioid prescriptions. Even though chronic pain remains a serious issue, they see no high-quality evidence showing that opioids work for long-term pain.

Dr. Conrad Sichler, an addiction specialist, wrote in a letter to the Globe and Mail, “the causes of addiction are not the drugs; they are emotional pain, social emptiness.” He suggests an alternative to potential dependency is “learning how to connect with others, and that finding meaning and purpose can address the roots of addiction”.

Promising solutions based on paying attention to the emotional as well as the physical needs of patients are on the rise. One therapy has to do with exploring the role love plays in the healing process.

Since some studies show that something as simple as a hug can relieve pain and stress, what effect could being conscious of an unlimited, permanent, divine source of love have on ending pain and enabling a drug free life?

The Scriptural promise “ God has not given us a spirit of fear and timidity, but of power, love, and self-­discipline” provides a practical way to think differently about the source of our health.
 Better understanding this promise can shift a dependency on drugs to the liberating realization that each of us is governed by a divine Love – expressed through greater joy, health and harmony.

Here’s how one young man did this.©Glowmages ~ put thought on solid foundation

When John was in sales, he travelled extensively and suffered from migraines and stomach ulcers. He kept painkillers in his pocket and used them daily.

He was familiar with the Bible, but a relative introduced him to a book that highlights and explains the healing work of Jesus, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy. It caught his interest as he read of the principles of healing that can be learned and applied in modern day life.

One idea that convinced him that he could find health and freedom was the sentence, “God is the creator of man, and, the divine Principle of man remaining perfect, the divine idea or reflection, man, remains perfect.”

John felt the power of this concept ­ of being perfect because he has this loving and close relationship to his Creator. As he studied more deeply, he understood that his health and freedom were not based on the pills in a bottle, but on the truth that he was the man of God’s making – made in his likeness as the Bible says.

He realized one day that he had stopped taking the painkillers some time earlier. The migraines and ulcer were gone ­ and this took place many years ago. Today, he sometimes celebrates that he can eat hot and spicy food!

The relentless cycle of pain and drug dependency can be broken. An expanded view of a universal source of divine Love is a practical starting point for anyone.

As I am a community blogger throughout Ontario on Metroland Media, you can read this article on the Brampton Guardian edition.

Judgment and judging is so present everywhere today. What are some ways to avoid participating in it or preventing it in our interactions?

Laura Lapointe says: A few years ago, I got to know a woman with whom I sang in a gospel choir. I had come to really respect and admire her

The post Judgment and judging is so present everywhere today. What are some ways to avoid participating in it or preventing it in our interactions? appeared first on time4thinkers.

Laura LaPointeLaura Lapointe says: A few years ago, I got to know a woman with whom I sang in a gospel choir. I had come to really respect and admire her dedication to living her faith, so I was surprised to learn that she had lived with a man she had dated for a long time, despite the fact that the relationship had been unhappy in many ways. I had been brought up to believe that people shouldn’t live together if they weren’t married, and frankly, I was internally judging my friend.

I didn’t realize it at the time, but my judging her was based on my own insecurity—a fear that I might find myself in a similar situation, in a relationship that wasn’t healthy or didn’t live up to the moral standard that I wanted to observe. A few months later, I found myself hanging out with a man who kept saying he wanted to have a baby with me, without any talk of marriage. While we didn’t live together, there was an intense attraction between us, and I found myself pushing boundaries that felt right for me in terms of physical intimacy. The relationship ended quickly, but I struggled with feelings of self-condemnation. Part of what brought healing was letting go of any sense of judgment of my friend, who had been in a similar situation. After going through my experience, how could I have anything but compassion for her?

Compassion is love in action. When Jesus was confronted with immoral behavior, there are several references to him being “moved with compassion.” This was his antidote to judging. When a woman who was considered a sinner interrupted him at a dinner party at Simon’s house, Jesus went so far as to say, “Your sins are forgiven.” 1 This story is also used as a teaching example at the beginning of the chapter in Science and Health where Mary Baker Eddy discusses the essential elements of a successful healing practice. To me, the message is that in any situation where we encounter behavior that would prompt us to judge, pure love, not judgment, is the healing answer.

Jesus said, “I did not come to judge the world, but to save the world.” 2 If we want to be part of that Christly mission, we can let go of any hardness of heart and feel embraced in divine Love, which wipes away fear and “moves us to compassion”—toward others as well as ourselves—whether or not we understand someone’s choices. And that “perfect love” 3 will heal and save us—and those we care about.

Laura is a Christian Science practitioner and lecturer living in San Diego, California.

What do YOU think? Add your comment below.

Notes:

  1. See Luke 7
  2. John 12:47, New International Version
  3. See I John 4:18

The post Judgment and judging is so present everywhere today. What are some ways to avoid participating in it or preventing it in our interactions? appeared first on time4thinkers.

The healing power of gratitude

Who would have thought that a simple ’thank you’ is worthy of a scientific study? Robert Emmons, Ph.D., and professor at the University of California, Davis, has written the first major scientific study on gratitude – its causes, and potential impact on human health. Published findings from his studies have shown that a conscious focus […]

'Are we grateful for the good already received..?'

‘Are we grateful for the good already received..?’

Who would have thought that a simple ’thank you’ is worthy of a scientific study?

Robert Emmons, Ph.D., and professor at the University of California, Davis, has written the first major scientific study on gratitude – its causes, and potential impact on human health. Published findings from his studies have shown that a conscious focus on blessings improved moods, coping skills and overall physical well-being.

Emmons says, ‘Gratitude is one of the few things that can measurably heal, energize and change people’s lives. It is a turning of the mind, not what I don’t have, but what I have already.’

As Canadians head into their Thanksgiving holiday, many will gather around a family table and acknowledge their blessings. Still, for many, there will be a ‘but’ after the ‘thank you’. It sounds like this: ‘Thanks, BUT I really need a bigger house, more friends, that promotion,’ etc.

Ingratitude blocks the ability to see what we already have. Inspiration from a well-used guidebook in my life asks the question: ‘Are we really grateful for the good already received?’ And follows with the promise: ‘Then we shall avail ourselves of the blessings we have, and thus be fitted to receive more.’

It’s clear that being satisfied with what we have is crucial to our well-being. That’s not always easy.
And, it might help if we take a look at the source of the good in our lives and how understanding and acknowledging that – regularly – can result in blessings that might at first seem impossible.

A well-known historical example of what gratitude – right in the midst of what looked like real lack – produces is when Jesus was faced with

'...then we shall be fitted to receive more..'

‘…then we shall be fitted to receive more..’

feeding a crowd of thousands. His disciples saw that they did not have enough to satisfy their needs. He did not see it as lack; he saw it as a misperception of the fact that God – not the sea or the land – provides everything we need. In his view, since God is infinite, there could be no limit to His provision for the crowd. He expressed gratitude for what they had before he instructed that the crowd be fed. They were satisfied – and even took home leftovers!

If true satisfaction comes from an understanding that the good in our life has a constant source in the Divine, then we can and should acknowledge ongoing, infinite good even when the evidence is not immediately apparent.

My friend, Carol, confirmed Emmons’ findings on how a conscious focus on blessings can improve health. She told me of a time when everyone around her had all the symptoms of the ‘flu’. She awoke one morning with similar symptoms, but immediately started going over everything she had to be grateful for and acknowledging the ever-present, Divine source of all good in her life. She could see that since sickness isn’t good, it isn’t from, or of, God. So, she could refuse to let it have any effect on her well-being. Very quickly, she felt totally well and energized, and went about her day.

Gratitude unlocks the door to understanding that the good in our lives has a constant source in the Divine. Little wonder it leads to better health.

Wishing my Canadian readers a cornucopia of Thanksgiving blessings!

This article was published in several Metroland online media outlets, such as Inside Ottawa Valley

Vibrant Reading Rooms

Vibrant Reading Rooms, by Patricia P. Wilson Vibrant – pulsating with life, vigor or activity; responsive; brisk; bustling; humming; rousing; stirring; thriving; thronging; abounding; overflowing; populous; astir; alive; teeming Quiet – marked by little or no motion; enjoyed in peace or relaxation; free from noise or uproar; serene; still; unobtrusive; conservative; …

108050432_bbf76fd5fcVibrant Reading Rooms, by Patricia P. Wilson

Vibrant – pulsating with life, vigor or activity; responsive; brisk; bustling; humming; rousing; stirring; thriving; thronging; abounding; overflowing; populous; astir; alive; teeming

Quiet – marked by little or no motion; enjoyed in peace or relaxation; free from noise or uproar; serene; still; unobtrusive; conservative; speechless; wordless; secluded; asleep; dead; inactive; sleepy

I. Church Manual model – vibrant or quiet?
(From the Manual of The Mother Church by Mary Baker Eddy)

Reading Rooms Article XXI. Establishment. Section 1. Each church of the Christian Science denomination shall have a Reading Room, though two or more churches may unite in having Reading Rooms, provided these rooms are well located.

Librarian. Sect. 2. The individuals who take charge of the Reading Rooms of The Mother Church shall be elected by the Christian Science Board of Directors, subject to the approval of Mary Baker Eddy. He or she shall have no bad habits, shall have had experience in the Field, shall be well educated, and a devout Christian Scientist.

Literature in Reading Rooms. Sect. 3. The literature sold or exhibited in the Reading Rooms of Christian Science Churches shall consist only of SCIENCE AND HEALTH WITH KEY TO THE SCRIPTURES, by Mary Baker Eddy, and other writings by this author; also the literature published or sold by The Christian Science Publishing Society.

ARTICLE 23 Branch Churches. Teachers’ and Practitioners’ Offices. Sect. 11. Teachers and practitioners of Christian Science shall not have their offices or rooms in the branch churches, in the Reading Rooms, nor in rooms connected therewith.

ARTICLE 25 The Christian Science Publishing Society. Rule of Conduct. Sect. 7. No objectionable pictures shall be exhibited in the rooms where the Christian Science textbook is published or sold. No idle gossip, no slander, no mischief-making, no evil speaking shall be allowed.

II. Your model — vibrant or quiet? Based on the following definitions, how does your Reading Room measure up?

Establish – to bring into existence; to make firm or stable; to put into a favorable position;
to gain full recognition or acceptance of; to introduce and cause to multiply and grow

Have – to make the effort to perform; show; exercise; exhibit; to entertain in the mind; to cause to be in a certain place or state; to be competent in

Read – to become acquainted with; to look over the contents of; to receive or take in. Note: “study” is not a synonym for “read”

Room – an extent of space sufficient or available for something; a suitable or fit occasion or opportunity; freedom; capacity

Charge – having the qualities of a forceful leader; supervision or management
Exhibit – to present to view; to show or display outwardly especially by visible signs or actions; to have as a readily discernible quality or feature

Sell – to develop a belief in the truth, value or desirability of; to gain acceptance; to persuade or influence to a course of action; to give into the power of another

Thoughts to ponder:

Does the Manual imply that Reading Rooms are chapels? libraries?
Does the Manual imply that it is wrong or unpleasant to engage in the work of selling?
Are bricks and mortar essential to a RR?
Should RR workers be well-trained and skilled in the art to selling?
Does a vibrant RR count how many people pass by or look in the window?
Even if you have a big sign out in front, if people rarely come into your RR, is it truly established?

i.e., has it gained full recognition within your community?
How much does it cost to have a vibrant Reading Room?
How many workers does a vibrant Reading Room need?
How many products does a vibrant Reading Room need?
How many hours does it take to have a vibrant Reading Room?
How long does it take to change from a quiet/sleepy place to a vibrant one?
What does it mean to “walk a customer”? Does this happen in your RR? If so, why?

In the early 1900s, a Chicago RR, located on the 8th floor of an office building, consistently sold 4,000 of S&H a year, plus 15,000 Sentinels. Profits from sales covered all expenses including the librarian’s salaries. Profits were returned to the three sponsoring branch churches. Quiet or vibrant? Was it a fluke, or can it be repeated today?

A woman in Ghana ordered 240 copies of S&H and sold them out of her wheelbarrow. Quiet or vibrant?

A woman in Hawaii sold S&H out of her briefcase. Quiet or vibrant?

A mom and her two sons sold 13 copies of S&H at a farmers market. Quiet or vibrant? (See video on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOEyHefa888) (P.S. The boys earned pocket money for their efforts.)

The Mother Church sells S&H from a 4-wheel cart located at an indoor shopping mall. Quiet or vibrant? 15 copies of S&H were sold at a Church Alive Summit in the Philippines. Quiet or vibrant?

For many more examples, check out www.JSH-ChristianScience.com and search for “Selling Science and Health”.

(c) 2013 Patricia Wilson – used with permission.
This article was used in a Christian Science Reading Room workshop presented by Patricia Wilson at the Philippines Youth Summit April 2013. Patricia served as a Reading Room representative for The Mother Church from approximately 1998-2002. In that capacity, she worked with about sixty Christian Science Reading Rooms from the East Coast states and Chicago metro area. She’s listed as a Practitioner in the Christian Science Journal and divides her time between Seoul South Korea and Florida.

Vibrant Reading Rooms

Vibrant Reading Rooms, by Patricia P. Wilson Vibrant – pulsating with life, vigor or activity; responsive; brisk; bustling; humming; rousing; stirring; thriving; thronging; abounding; overflowing; populous; astir; alive; teeming Quiet – marked by little or no motion; enjoyed in peace or relaxation; free from noise or uproar; serene; still; unobtrusive; conservative; …

108050432_bbf76fd5fcVibrant Reading Rooms, by Patricia P. Wilson

Vibrant – pulsating with life, vigor or activity; responsive; brisk; bustling; humming; rousing; stirring; thriving; thronging; abounding; overflowing; populous; astir; alive; teeming

Quiet – marked by little or no motion; enjoyed in peace or relaxation; free from noise or uproar; serene; still; unobtrusive; conservative; speechless; wordless; secluded; asleep; dead; inactive; sleepy

I. Church Manual model – vibrant or quiet?
(From the Manual of The Mother Church by Mary Baker Eddy)

Reading Rooms Article XXI. Establishment. Section 1. Each church of the Christian Science denomination shall have a Reading Room, though two or more churches may unite in having Reading Rooms, provided these rooms are well located.

Librarian. Sect. 2. The individuals who take charge of the Reading Rooms of The Mother Church shall be elected by the Christian Science Board of Directors, subject to the approval of Mary Baker Eddy. He or she shall have no bad habits, shall have had experience in the Field, shall be well educated, and a devout Christian Scientist.

Literature in Reading Rooms. Sect. 3. The literature sold or exhibited in the Reading Rooms of Christian Science Churches shall consist only of SCIENCE AND HEALTH WITH KEY TO THE SCRIPTURES, by Mary Baker Eddy, and other writings by this author; also the literature published or sold by The Christian Science Publishing Society.

ARTICLE 23 Branch Churches. Teachers’ and Practitioners’ Offices. Sect. 11. Teachers and practitioners of Christian Science shall not have their offices or rooms in the branch churches, in the Reading Rooms, nor in rooms connected therewith.

ARTICLE 25 The Christian Science Publishing Society. Rule of Conduct. Sect. 7. No objectionable pictures shall be exhibited in the rooms where the Christian Science textbook is published or sold. No idle gossip, no slander, no mischief-making, no evil speaking shall be allowed.

II. Your model — vibrant or quiet? Based on the following definitions, how does your Reading Room measure up?

Establish – to bring into existence; to make firm or stable; to put into a favorable position;
to gain full recognition or acceptance of; to introduce and cause to multiply and grow

Have – to make the effort to perform; show; exercise; exhibit; to entertain in the mind; to cause to be in a certain place or state; to be competent in

Read – to become acquainted with; to look over the contents of; to receive or take in. Note: “study” is not a synonym for “read”

Room – an extent of space sufficient or available for something; a suitable or fit occasion or opportunity; freedom; capacity

Charge – having the qualities of a forceful leader; supervision or management
Exhibit – to present to view; to show or display outwardly especially by visible signs or actions; to have as a readily discernible quality or feature

Sell – to develop a belief in the truth, value or desirability of; to gain acceptance; to persuade or influence to a course of action; to give into the power of another

Thoughts to ponder:

Does the Manual imply that Reading Rooms are chapels? libraries?
Does the Manual imply that it is wrong or unpleasant to engage in the work of selling?
Are bricks and mortar essential to a RR?
Should RR workers be well-trained and skilled in the art to selling?
Does a vibrant RR count how many people pass by or look in the window?
Even if you have a big sign out in front, if people rarely come into your RR, is it truly established?

i.e., has it gained full recognition within your community?
How much does it cost to have a vibrant Reading Room?
How many workers does a vibrant Reading Room need?
How many products does a vibrant Reading Room need?
How many hours does it take to have a vibrant Reading Room?
How long does it take to change from a quiet/sleepy place to a vibrant one?
What does it mean to “walk a customer”? Does this happen in your RR? If so, why?

In the early 1900s, a Chicago RR, located on the 8th floor of an office building, consistently sold 4,000 of S&H a year, plus 15,000 Sentinels. Profits from sales covered all expenses including the librarian’s salaries. Profits were returned to the three sponsoring branch churches. Quiet or vibrant? Was it a fluke, or can it be repeated today?

A woman in Ghana ordered 240 copies of S&H and sold them out of her wheelbarrow. Quiet or vibrant?

A woman in Hawaii sold S&H out of her briefcase. Quiet or vibrant?

A mom and her two sons sold 13 copies of S&H at a farmers market. Quiet or vibrant? (See video on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOEyHefa888) (P.S. The boys earned pocket money for their efforts.)

The Mother Church sells S&H from a 4-wheel cart located at an indoor shopping mall. Quiet or vibrant? 15 copies of S&H were sold at a Church Alive Summit in the Philippines. Quiet or vibrant?

For many more examples, check out www.JSH-ChristianScience.com and search for “Selling Science and Health”.

(c) 2013 Patricia Wilson – used with permission.
This article was used in a Christian Science Reading Room workshop presented by Patricia Wilson at the Philippines Youth Summit April 2013. Patricia served as a Reading Room representative for The Mother Church from approximately 1998-2002. In that capacity, she worked with about sixty Christian Science Reading Rooms from the East Coast states and Chicago metro area. She’s listed as a Practitioner in the Christian Science Journal and divides her time between Seoul South Korea and Florida.

The Success of Mind-Body Medicine Depends on Us

A guest post – introduction by Bob Cummings from Michigan and article by Eric Nelson, California “Dr. Viggiano, noting that the act of taking a pill is often just an external trigger to what she describes as an internal or ‘central’ healing response, wonders what this tells us about our thoughts in terms of their effect on health and healing.”
Read more…

A guest post – introduction by Bob Cummings from Michigan and article by Eric Nelson, California

©Glowimages

©Glowimages

“Dr. Viggiano, noting that the act of taking a pill is often just an external trigger to what she describes as an internal or ‘central’ healing response, wonders what this tells us about our thoughts in terms of their effect on health and healing.”

This observation comes from Dr. Darlene Viggiano at the Saybrook School of Mind-Body Medicine in a thoughtful Washington Times article last week by Eric Nelson of Los Altos, California. Nelson interviewed three doctors who work at Saybrook University in San Francisco, the only institution in the U.S. offering advanced degrees (PhD, Masters) in mind-body medicine.

The article includes two very interesting accounts, one of a young girl suffering anxiety attacks learning to rely on thought-based coping skills and another of a patient who suffered declining health as a result of misinterpreting something his doctor told him.

Nelson concludes by discussing the need for ”an individual willingness to adopt a higher, more inspired view of health.”

Definitely recommended reading: The success of mind-body medicine depends on us.

Does Science and Health need an update?

QUESTION: Does Science and Health need an update? It’s a 19th century book. Does it need modernizing for the 21st century? Phil Davis says:You mean do we need a Science

QUESTION: Does Science and Health need an update? It’s a 19th century book. Does it need modernizing for the 21st century?

Phil Davis says:You mean do we need a Science and Health 2.0? I can understand why some people might think so, but I don’t see it that way. Frankly, I’d rather make a case for being a Christian Scientist 2.0! Let me explain why.

As a Christian Scientist, I have a special place in my heart and mind for the book Science and Health. It, along with the Bible, is the Pastor of my church. I take Mary Baker Eddy at her word that it contains the full statement of Christian Science.

Sure, if she were here today, maybe she would update  the prose a bit, although not the message. But it’s a moot point, since she is not here, and I think it would take the author of this unique book to change it to any degree.

Anyway, I think we’re only talking about new readers of the book. Most of us long-time Christian Scientists have already gotten through the “dated” prose problem. And that’s what leads me to being a Christian Scientist 2.0.

Mrs. Eddy made it clear that the prosperity of Christian Science and its impact on the world largely rests with us—its members and practitioners. We are called by our Master and Leader to heal the world. That is not something to take lightly, nor to wait passively until others find a church or read the book.

Being a Christian Scientist 2.0, for me, is to embrace the public in a far more proactive way. Jesus spoke about preparing the soil for the seed, in other words, preparing their thought for the Word of God. When we love enough to heal others, we are preparing the thought for Christian Science. This is the Christ touching their hearts through our own ministry of healing. When they feel that Christly touch, then they will gladly do the reading, studying and even wrestling with Science and Health to make it their textbook.

So, my question is: who is ready to be updated?

Phil is a Christian Science practitioner and authorized teacher of Christian Science from the Chicago, IL area.

What do YOU think? Add your comment below.

More Authority over Your Mind

Do you sometimes feel trapped by intrusive or habitual thoughts, emotions, images? If you’ve tried changing your mind from the inside, try this practice of exercising authority over it from the outside. Like a sculptor. Picture in your mind how sculptors work– they move and chisel outside and above the … Continue reading

Do you sometimes feel trapped by intrusive or habitual thoughts, emotions, images? If you’ve tried changing your mind from the inside, try this practice of exercising authority over it from the outside. Like a sculptor. Picture in your mind how sculptors work– they move and chisel outside and above the … Continue reading →

S+C | Politics and Religion

Episode #26 is a conversation with Will Buchanan on the relationship between politics and spiritual ideas. Sometimes the effort to discuss politics and religious convictions in the same conversation can be hazardous. All the more reason to find a basis for successful conversations. Will is a student at Principia College, where he’s studying political science. […]

Episode #26 is a conversation with Will Buchanan on the relationship between politics and spiritual ideas.

Sometimes the effort to discuss politics and religious convictions in the same conversation can be hazardous. All the more reason to find a basis for successful conversations.

Will is a student at Principia College, where he’s studying political science. He’s also deeply committed to  his spiritual growth. Our discussion raises questions and uncovers possibilities for those who deeply care about the relevance of spiritual living in a political context.willandshirley

Whether you lean left or right, it’s encouraging to find common ground in the belief that God’s goodness is available to everyone at all times. It gives hope for peace, and it encourages grace in the midst of our differences.

It might be helpful to clarify one point in the podcast conversation. Near the end of the podcast, Will is discussing “three degrees” of human experience, which come from his study of Mary Baker Eddy’s book, Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (115). He is distinguishing between the second and third degrees, in which the second is a transitional state of thought to the third level, which includes spiritual understanding and power. Will describes the meaning of that third state of human thought without clearly identifying it; but his point is that it’s helpful for us as humans to be clear about the type of thinking we bring to our experiences. We are able to achieve wisdom, spiritual understanding, and spiritual power (the “third degree”) as we grow spiritually; and on that basis we are not victims of politics, but contributors to society’s well-being.

Please do join us in this conversation. We’re interested in they way you make connections between your spiritual searching and your political pragmatism. Share your comments at the end of the show notes on the website, SpiritualityandChristianity.com.

Some relevant links:

The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life Religion and Ethics Newsweekly See spirituality.com for podcast reference to Science and Health