Mary Baker Eddy Library – Mary Baker Eddy and the Puritans

Early this month the Mary Baker Eddy Library website posted a podcast highlighting Dr. David Hall, author of The Puritans: A Transatlantic History (2019): How should we view the Puritans, and their religious and cultural legacy? This episode explores that question with Dr. David Hall, author of The Puritans: A Transatlantic History (2019). As he explains, there […]

Early this month the Mary Baker Eddy Library website posted a podcast highlighting Dr. David Hall, author of The Puritans: A Transatlantic History (2019):

How should we view the Puritans, and their religious and cultural legacy? This episode explores that question with Dr. David Hall, author of The Puritans: A Transatlantic History (2019). As he explains, there was much more to these people than the stern, judgmental caricature that has followed them through the years. In fact, Hall says, when we look at how the Puritans felt about God’s presence in their lives, “the word love leaps out at us.” For Mary Baker Eddy, her Puritan heritage  left a deep and abiding impression—one she both contested and valued. Learn how the Puritan concept of “spiritual sense” in the human heart connected to her vision.

If you would like to view the article in full and listen to the podcast on https://www.marybakereddylibrary.org,
please click here. 

 

Christian Science Sentinel – A landmark to celebrate

The Christian Science Sentinel posted an article by Ethel A. Baker titled, A landmark to celebrate. The article chooses two selections from Mary Baker’s writings to help celebrate 100 years of the ratification to the 19th amendment: August 18 marked one hundred years since the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women’s […]

A Landmark To CelebrateThe Christian Science Sentinel posted an article by Ethel A. Baker titled, A landmark to celebrate. The article chooses two selections from Mary Baker’s writings to help celebrate 100 years of the ratification to the 19th amendment:

August 18 marked one hundred years since the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified, guaranteeing women’s suffrage. Perhaps less well known, fifteen nations had already enacted similar legislation, beginning in 1893 with New Zealand, followed by Finland, Australia, Norway, Denmark, Russia, Lithuania, Canada, Austria, Latvia, Georgia, Germany, Poland, Hungary, and Estonia. And since then, with but a few exceptions remaining in the world, more than 170 countries have legally acknowledged a woman’s right to vote and to hold elective office…

 

To view the article in full on https://sentinel.christianscience.com for free,

please click HERE

 

 

New in the Reading Room!

 
Now available as an Audio CD!  Church Manual of The Mother Church by Mary Baker Eddy.  Available now in our Bookstore for $38 plus tax. 

 

Now available as an Audio CD!  Church Manual of The Mother Church by Mary Baker Eddy.  Available now in our Bookstore for $38 plus tax. 

FREE PUBLIC TALK

MIRACLES REDEFINED: Experience the Divine in Everyday Life.
by Heike Arneith, from Munich, Germany

MIRACLES REDEFINED: Experience the Divine in Everyday Life.
by Heike Arneith, from Munich, Germany

Mary Baker Eddy Library – Women of History: Miyo Matsukata

   This month the Mary Baker Eddy Library website highlights a woman by the name of Miyo Matsukata. This blog celebrates women in history: Miyo Matsukata (1891–1984) was one of the first Japanese Christian Scientists. Dedicated to shepherding a newfound religion in an adopted country, she drew on her faith and unique cross-cultural background, challenging opposition […]

   This month the Mary Baker Eddy Library website highlights a woman by the name of Miyo Matsukata. This blog celebrates women in history:

Miyo Matsukata (1891–1984) was one of the first Japanese Christian Scientists. Dedicated to shepherding a newfound religion in an adopted country, she drew on her faith and unique cross-cultural background, challenging opposition to Western religion and the difficulties of World War II.

Born in New York City to Japanese parents, she and her older brother were among the first nisei (second-generation Japanese) on the United States East Coast. Her American childhood was punctuated by summers spent with her grandparents in Japan. At the age of 21, she moved there and married Shokuma Matsukata, the son of a prominent Japanese politician.1Acclimating to a new culture was difficult for her, and she struggled with the traditions and customs of Japanese life, to the point that her health was affected.

In 1917, when the practice of Christian Science was mostly limited to westerners, Matsukata accompanied a friend to a Christian Science lecture, given by Clarence Chadwick in Yokohama.3 4 5 “What hope and joy awakened in me,” she wrote, “when I realized that Christian Science had a divine Principle.”6 As a result she began her own study of Christian Science. At that same time two other Japanese women—Sute Mitsui and Tatsuo Takaki—also learned about Christian Science individually. All three became committed to the faith, despite the fact that it “challenged many rigid customs” and that its practice in this period “required courage as well as tact, patience, wisdom, and love.”7 They turned to Florence E. Boynton, a Christian Scientist schoolteacher from America, to help them and their children in their study.8 According to Matsukata, Boynton “did much to prepare the soil, to sow good seed, and then to care for the growth of that seed.”9

About 1924, Matsukata and her husband hosted Frances Thurber Seal, a visitor to Japan who had earlier helped introduce Christian Science in Germany. Through Seal, she learned about schools for Christian Scientists in the United States (The Principia, in Missouri, and Principia College, in Illinois). Eventually all of Boynton’s young students, including Matsukata’s children, went to study at these institutions.10

Christian Science was spreading slowly in Japan, gaining strength through the efforts of various interconnected Japanese families. The first informal group of Christian Scientists began meeting in 1924. The Mother Church in Boston (The First Church of Christ, Scientist) recognized them in 1931 as Christian Science Society, Tokyo.11 Cultural and linguistic factors made the translation of many terms into Japanese difficult, and at that time people could only study Christian Science in English. That limited its growth, since the general population did not speak English and was unfamiliar with Christianity.12 Matsukata credited her New England education and exposure to Puritan ideas with an ability to understand Mary Baker Eddy’s discovery and accomplishments.13

However, the greatest challenge to this emerging Japanese group came during World War II. Before the United States entered the war, Japan began limiting Western influences and activities. The Society in Tokyo disbanded in 1941, anticipating a law requiring all Christian denominations to unite under the “Christian Church of Japan.” While westerners like Florence Boynton returned to their home countries, Christian Science services continued secretly at Matsukata’s home until the April 1942 bombing of Tokyo.14

A period of isolation followed, in which many Japanese Christian Scientists felt cut off from the world and in particular from The Mother Church. Matsukata initially felt that estrangement. But she later wrote that, when reading “Being is Unfoldment”—an article by Mary Sands Lee in the January 1941 Christian Science Journal—she was struck by the statement that “divine progress is universal as well as individual.” Matsukata later noted this reminded her that “nothing could separate me from divine Love”15 and that it helped her renew a feeling of connection throughout the war. Takashi Oka, who became a correspondent for The Christian Science Monitor, was a Sunday School student in Tokyo when the war began. He later remembered Matsukata as having a strong sense of unity with The Mother Church. She was able to help bridge feelings of separation for other Japanese Christian Scientists by secretly collecting Christian Science literature, mailed under diplomatic protection from Swedish friends to Widar Bagge, the Swedish Minister, who lived next door to the Matsukatas.16

If you would like to read and view the article in full on https://www.marybakereddylibrary.org,
please click here. 

 

Earning a Girl Scout badge while learning about Mary Baker Eddy for Women’s History Month? Why not!

This story was contributed by Karen McMullen, of Denton, Texas, and shares how she helped organize a Girl Scout badge earning opportunity for her local troop. Check it out, and …

Girl Scouts earning a badge

This story was contributed by Karen McMullen, of Denton, Texas, and shares how she helped organize a Girl Scout badge earning opportunity for her local troop. Check it out, and see if you can think of other fun and interesting ways to reach out to your local community!

Free Girl Scout Badge Workshop on “Who was Mary Baker Eddy?” for Women’s History Month

24 Girls Scouts learned about Mary Baker Eddy, The Christian Science Monitor, and The Christian Science Reading room in 2 workshops. Brownies, Juniors and Caddett Girl Scouts were invited through the local Girl Scout Service Unit. The first workshop filled up in 15 minutes of posting the event and there was a waiting list of 20 more girls so we added a second workshop the following weekend.

Here is what we did:

We started the workshop with a 9 minute video on Mary Baker Eddy – provided by the Mary Baker Eddy Library for the Betterment of Humanity. The video is a great tool to quickly cover her history and accomplishments. We used that material to have a discussion of her struggles and how she was able to overcome them. The Christian Science Monitor has a section in the weekly magazine called “People Making a Difference”. We reviewed a few articles from that section and asked the girls to write a brief description of how they would like to make a difference in their communities on a worksheet provided by the MBE Library. Then we moved on the a simple craft. In one of Eddy’s homes she had a cross stitch that read “ Do Right, Fear Not”. We had the girls cross stitch this phrase on card stock for them to finish at home and save. The idea tied in so well with how they could make a difference in the world. Next, we played a simple game of cat’s cradle with the younger girls. We had divided into 3 smaller groups, so the for the last activity we all came back together and preformed brief skits about the articles the girls wrote on how they would make a difference in the world. We all ate Eddy’s favorite food, ice cream, as we watched the skits. All the girls left with a certificate of completion for their badge and a copy of The Christian Science Monitor.

This event was Simple, Easy, Low Cost, Effective outreach to our community. If you would like to have details on how to do this in your area I would be happy to share.

Karen McMullen
dkammc@verizon.net

Girl Scouts earning a badge Girl Scouts earning a badge Girl Scouts earning a badge Girl Scouts earning a badge Girl Scouts earning a badge

Mary Baker Eddy Library – Women of History: Lilian Whiting

The Mary Baker Eddy Library website blog highlights a woman by the name of Lilian Whiting. This blog celebrates women in history: Lilian Whiting (1847–1942) was a journalist and author who covered women’s roles in the community and in the advancement of society. Perhaps not surprisingly her interest led her to Mary Baker Eddy, who […]

Women of History: Lilian WhitingThe Mary Baker Eddy Library website blog highlights a woman by the name of Lilian Whiting. This blog celebrates women in history:

Lilian Whiting (1847–1942) was a journalist and author who covered women’s roles in the community and in the advancement of society. Perhaps not surprisingly her interest led her to Mary Baker Eddy, who was beginning to attract attention as the discoverer and founder of Christian Science. The two women developed a friendship that lasted over two decades. An associate of Eddy outside of her religious movement, Whiting expressed appreciation for her accomplishments and sought to illuminate them for readers.

She was born Emily Lilian Whiting near Niagara Falls, New York, daughter of Illinois senator Lorenzo D. Whiting and Lucretia Clement Whiting. Lilian began her journalistic career in 1876 and is credited as one of the first women to edit a newspaper, serving as editor-in-chief of The Boston Budget from 1890 to 1896, after having worked for other publications in Boston. She is also known for writing the first biography of Kate Field, a well-known journalist and actor of the day.1

Whiting requested an interview with Eddy in 1885, writing that she was “interested in your [Eddy’s] line of thought.”2 Their subsequent meeting at the Massachusetts Metaphysical College resulted in an article in Ohio’s Cleveland Leader; it was one of the first major pieces about Eddy and Christian Science to appear outside of New England. Their meeting confirmed Whiting’s appreciation for Eddy, which she expressed publicly. Whiting also mentioned receiving personal benefit from their first meeting, explaining that although she had felt tired on arrival, she left “skipping.”3

Through correspondence in the Mary Baker Eddy Collection, we can chart the growth of mutual respect between these women, evident in the exchange of pleasantries and the sharing of books. In 1888 Eddy sent Whiting an inscribed copy of Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures4. Later Whiting wrote in thanks, “you have the one true philosophy of life,—that which begins and ends in God’s goodness.”5 In 1909 Whiting sent Eddy a copy of her volume From Dreamland Sent, inscribed “To the Reverend Mary Baker Eddy with the most grateful remembrance and the reverence and the love of Lilian Whiting Boston June days, 1909.”6

In her copy of Whiting’s publication The World Beautiful, Eddy made note of this paragraph:

Human love or friendship cannot give its gifts where they are unwelcome or unheeded. Your friend may long to pour out to you the treasures of his love, his care, his tenderness, his service; but unless you respond to them, he cannot give them. A gift presupposes two persons always,—not only one to give, but one, also to receive.

 

If you would like to see the full article on https://www.marybakereddylibrary.org, please click here. 

 

Webcast — A Spiritual Revolution: The Quest To Experience God

Ever wondered if there was more to life than what you were experiencing? Are you wanting more than just to hear about God? The Healing 101 Series is hosting a free online webcast by Giulia Nesi, CSB — from Fairfield, Connecticut on March 26, 2019 at 7:30pm (Pacific Standard Time). Register for this free live […]

 A Spiritual Revolution: the Quest to Experience God

  • Ever wondered if there was more to life than what you were experiencing?
  • Are you wanting more than just to hear about God?

The Healing 101 Series is hosting a free online webcast by Giulia Nesi, CSB — from Fairfield, Connecticut on March 26, 2019 at 7:30pm (Pacific Standard Time). Register for this free live webcast by clicking here.

Giulia has spent her entire career in the healthcare field. She is a practitioner and teacher of Christian Science and former psychotherapist. In her talk, she will explain how experiencing God brings healing to our lives and is possible for anyone, anytime, anywhere. Giulia enjoys talking with people about their spiritual journey and sharing the profound insights contained in Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures by Mary Baker Eddy. She’s been on the faculty of Harvard Medical School’s symposium Spirituality & Healing in Medicine, managed a special project established to respond to the growing interest from healthcare professionals in Christian Science, and has lectured widely to both professional healthcare audiences and the general public.

 

For more information regarding the free Healing 101 series, click here.

 

Gender, Spirituality, and the Architecture of The Mother Church

The Mary Baker Eddy Library website has a recent Seekers and Scholars Podcast titled, Gender, Spirituality, and the Architecture of The Mother Church. The podcast guest is Dr. Jeanne Halgren Kilde, Director of the Religious Studies Program at the University of Minnesota. This episode explores the two edifices of The Mother Church on the Christian […]

Gender, Spirituality, And The Architecture Of The Mother ChurchThe Mary Baker Eddy Library website has a recent Seekers and Scholars Podcast titled, Gender, Spirituality, and the Architecture of The Mother Church. The podcast guest is Dr. Jeanne Halgren Kilde, Director of the Religious Studies Program at the University of Minnesota.

This episode explores the two edifices of The Mother Church on the Christian Science Plaza in Boston. Guest Dr. Jeanne Kilde discusses how issues around gender in religion influenced design choices for the two buildings. She draws from her prize-winning article “Material Expression and Materialism in Mary Baker Eddy’s Boston Churches: How Architecture and Gender Compromised Mind.” Kilde poses the idea that Mary Baker Eddy’s followers misread the meaning behind an emphasis on God’s feminine nature in the first building. This, she asserts, forced Eddy to revert to a more masculine style for the church’s Extension, built 12 years later.

To listen to this podcast on https://www.marybakereddylibrary.org, please click here. 

 

Mary Baker Eddy Library – Storytime in the Book Nook: Mercy

The Mary Baker Eddy Library website has a series titled, Storytime in the Book Nook. If you have not yet checked out this series, it consists of tales about colorful characters that are read from various books. The series takes place every first and third Tuesday of the month and is recommended for bookworms ages 5 […]

Storytime in the Book Nook: MercyThe Mary Baker Eddy Library website has a series titled, Storytime in the Book Nook. If you have not yet checked out this series, it consists of tales about colorful characters that are read from various books. The series takes place every first and third Tuesday of the month and is recommended for bookworms ages 5 years old and younger with adults. The next one takes place on January 15th between 10:30 AM – 11:15 AM Eastern Time Zone and the topic is “mercy”.

For more information please contact the Educational Programs Coordinator Marie Palladino at 617-450-7203 or palladinom@mbelibrary.org

…Mary was a bookworm. Sometimes when her siblings went out to play, she’d stay at home reading. Other times when she joined them, as often as not she’d eventually slip away to a secluded spot where they’d find her later, engrossed in a book.
—From A World More Bright: The Life of Mary Baker Eddy by Isabel Ferguson and Heather Vogel Frederick

 

If you would like to see the full article on https://www.marybakereddylibrary.org, please click here.