How can I experience a satisfying life?

“I can’t get no, satisfaction!” the Rolling Stones famously sung. They were articulating a feeling we have probably all felt at some time. So how do we find true, lasting satisfaction in our constantly changing world? In this audio program I respond to a variety of questions from listeners about how to experience a satisfying life.

The post How can I experience a satisfying life? appeared first on Mark Unger C.S..

“I can’t get no, satisfaction!” the Rolling Stones famously sung. They were articulating a feeling we have probably all felt at some time. So how do we find true, lasting satisfaction in our constantly changing world? In this audio program I respond to a variety of questions from listeners about how to experience a satisfying life.

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The post How can I experience a satisfying life? appeared first on Mark Unger C.S..

A cup of kindness = a recipe for good health

The idea that giving is good for both the recipient and the giver is embedded in many religious and philosophical traditions. Only recently has medical science begun to take note of the health benefits and ask: “Why do they occur?” Studies show strong links between giving to others and overall good health. This effect may […]

Link between giving to others and good health

Link between giving to others and good health

The idea that giving is good for both the recipient and the giver is embedded in many religious and philosophical traditions. Only recently has medical science begun to take note of the health benefits and ask: “Why do they occur?”

Studies show strong links between giving to others and overall good health. This effect may be evidenced in emotional ways like feeling better about ourselves, as well as in physical ways – less stress affecting the body.

But the answer to why kindness relates to health will be long in coming if investigated only from a bio-medical standpoint. That’s because, fundamentally, the answer lies in expanding our understanding of how we are all connected to one spiritual (not material) source of life and goodness.

The Bible urges us to be ‘kindly affectioned one to another’ in a brotherly manner. That may feel difficult at times, but perhaps not so difficult if we keep the viewpoint that we are all brothers and sisters, children of the one Creator.

Because of this bond, a spirit of loving kindness toward our fellow man is simply innate.

The correlation between giving and health is foretold in Isaiah, where the prophet says: “…deal thy bread to the hungry….and bring the poor that are cast out to thy house….then shall thy light break forth as the morning and thine health shall spring forth speedily.”

Forgetting even in a degree our own needs and anxieties, and expressing kindness and consideration towards another is powerful . I like to think of this as ‘active unselfishness’; and I’ve experienced how it results in better health.

Compassion, kindness and generosity - health giving qualities

Compassion, kindness and generosity – health giving qualities

One day, while busy with errands and shopping, I felt a cold coming on. It made the errand running more difficult. However, there was a mother with a young unhappy child that was having a harder day than I was! So, I put my ‘to do’ list aside and helped her out with navigating the busy mall and tending to her child. Her gratitude was boundless, and by the end of the shopping, my cold symptoms had completely vanished.

We can all engage in random acts of kindness as we go about our day, from something as simple as a smile for all you meet, to giving away a good parking spot – ways to be ‘kindly affectioned, one to another.’

A single act may seem trivial, but compassion, kindness, and generosity are health-giving qualities we all possess from our source. To express them is a pretty simple recipe for blessing others and making us all healthier.

You can also read this article in several Metroland Community news editions, such as the Mississauga News.

Random Acts of Kindness: The Health Benefits to Canadians

The frenzied pace of holiday shopping is about to explode with consumer-based ‘Black Friday’ and ‘Cyber Monday’. However, in 2013, Canada embraced the global movement launched to counter this consumerism, called ‘Giving Tuesday’. Just as Black Friday kicks off the holiday shopping season, Giving Tuesday is the opening day of the giving season. Canadians from […]

Small acts of kindness speak volumes

Small acts of kindness speak volumes

The frenzied pace of holiday shopping is about to explode with consumer-based ‘Black Friday’ and ‘Cyber Monday’.

However, in 2013, Canada embraced the global movement launched to counter this consumerism, called ‘Giving Tuesday’. Just as Black Friday kicks off the holiday shopping season, Giving Tuesday is the opening day of the giving season. Canadians from coast to coast are encouraged to raise money, donate to charity or volunteer.

Small acts of kindness speak volumes; they encourage us to renew our faith in the presence of good in our lives.

And, while Giving Tuesday is all about doing good things for others, did you know that giving is also good for our own health?

In his book Why Good Things Happen to Good People, Stephen Post, a professor of preventative medicine at Stony Brook University, reports that giving to others has been shown to increase health benefits in people with chronic illness, including HIV and multiple sclerosis.

The idea that giving is good for both the recipient and the giver is embedded in many religious and philosophical traditions. Only recently has medical science begun to take note of the health benefits and ask: “Why do they occur?”

The answer to this question will be long in coming, if investigated only and entirely from a bio-medical standpoint. Because, fundamentally, the answer lies in expanding our understanding of the Divine and how we are all connected to one spiritual (not material) source of life and goodness.

As an avid student of the Bible, I’ve run across references that give us a glimpse of this correlation between health and giving – for example, in Isaiah, where the prophet says: “…deal thy bread to the hungry….and bring the poor that are cast out to thy house….then shall thy light break forth as the morning and thine health shall spring forth speedily.”

Giving is good for our health

Giving is good for our health

Forgetting our own needs and anxieties and expressing kindness and consideration towards another can bring healing. I like to think of this as ‘active unselfishness’.

One day while busy with Christmas errands and shopping, I was feeling the symptoms of a cold coming on. It made the errand running more difficult. However, there was a mother with a young unhappy child that was having a harder day than me. So I put my ‘to do’ list aside and helped her out with navigating the busy mall and tending to her child. Her gratitude was boundless and by the end of the shopping, my cold symptoms had completely vanished.

A single act may seem so trivial that it might not be classified as rendering a service, but compassion, kindness, and generosity – these health-giving qualities come from within each of us. They show our mutual tie to that one Divine source of goodness and life. It’s inevitable that this blesses others and makes us all healthier.

This article was published in several online Metroland publications, such as Mississauga News.

Random Acts of Kindness: The Health Benefits to Canadians

  The frenzied pace of holiday shopping erupted with consumer-focused ‘Black Friday’ and ‘Cyber Monday’.  However, a new movement was launched recently,  ‘Giving Tuesday’ – which followed Cyber Monday – and encouraged Canadians from coast to coast to raise money and/or volunteer. Did you know that giving is good for our health? Doing something unselfish […]

©Glowimages Do your acts of kindness make you healthier?

©Glowimages Do your acts of kindness make you healthier?

 

The frenzied pace of holiday shopping erupted with consumer-focused ‘Black Friday’ and ‘Cyber Monday’.  However, a new movement was launched recently,  ‘Giving Tuesday’ – which followed Cyber Monday – and encouraged Canadians from coast to coast to raise money and/or volunteer.

Did you know that giving is good for our health? Doing something unselfish not only makes us feel better about ourselves, it also gives a boost to our physical and mental health.

Studies find these health benefits associated with giving:

  • Lower blood pressure
  • Increased self-esteem
  • Less depression
  • Lower stress levels
  • Longer life

As an avid student of the Bible, I looked for references made long ago to the correlation of health and giving – as in Isaiah, where the prophet saw this connection between unselfishness and health: “…deal thy bread to the hungry….and bring the poor that are cast out to thy house….then shall thy light break forth as the morning and thine health shall spring forth speedily.”

Can the goodness of giving go viral?

Consider the phenomena of ‘pay-it-forward’ – popularized by the novel of the same name, which was made into a movie. Pay-it-forward means to repay a kindness by being kind to someone else rather than the person who was kind to you. This typically happens at your local drive-through.  You place your order and find at the cash window that the driver in front of you paid.

This may have occurred a few times a year a decade ago, but now, according to fast-food operators, it might happen several times a day. The

©Glowimages - Kindness

©Glowimages – Kindness

largest outbreak of this kind occurred at the Canadian icon, Tim Horton’s, in Winnipeg, Manitoba last December, when 228 cars paid it forward.

We can all choose to undertake unselfish acts towards others.

Other random acts of kindness may include:

  • Dropping off a toy or game at a homeless shelter
  • Shoveling the snow off your neighbour’s driveway
  • Reading to a child or elderly person
  • Visiting an animal shelter to give a hand

Compassion, kindness, and generosity – these health-giving qualities come from within each of us. Let our random act of kindness reach out to another.  We will all be healthier for it.